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problem-solvingTo succeed at work, employees must know how to solve problems. Are we so reactive that we quickly come up with an answer to satisfy a deadline? Or do we see what others are doing and simply apply their ideas? In training sessions, we often teach the process of problem solving but we don't always focus on how learners can apply the process in their daily lives. We need to emphasize a traditional method of problem solving, along with the components and skills necessary to perform the process.

Here's a process for problem solving:

  • Identify the issues with a simple SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).
  • Identify any missing information or assumptions that will have to be made.
  • Determine the problem.
  • Identify alternatives to solving the problem.
  • Evaluate alternatives and make a recommendation.
  • Determine the implementation process of your recommendation.
  • Determine how the process will be evaluated and provide a contingency plan.

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elearining prototypeWhen embarking on an elearning project, it can be intimidating to think about creating your own interface. There seems to be a never-ending stream of questions to consider: Where do I begin? How do I get buy-in from my stakeholders? Is the final product going to resonate with end users? Too often the questions become so daunting that designers fall back on molding content to fit a template.

The presentation of e-learning content is as critical as the content itself. You can have content of the highest quality, but if the presentation is poor, you will lose the end user. If the interface is confusing or the material is difficult to find, you are asking the end user to make an extra effort to learn.

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knowing-is-not-enoughWill the effective skills your participants are learning about in the classroom translate to what they do in the workplace? As someone who cares deeply about this question, I'm going to make two bold statements, and then make a recommendation.

  • Without a basic understanding of how learning happens, which is outlined in the rest of this article, there is very little chance that program participants will actually implement what they learned.
  • No many training organisations are presenting to training participants with this perspective.

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